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Stories of Impact

We are honored to share student and teacher stories about how gifts made to us have a direct impact. 

Read about how technology gifted to a high school computer class was used to help make the spring theater performance possible, how a GaGa Ball Pit gave students some much-needed stress relief, and how the purchase of nonfiction narrative books in a middle school made students feel less alone, along with many other stories.

 

Tristan Breum, a 7th-grade student, got support from an unexpected source as he ran his first 10K. 

A grant from LPS Foundation gives students the chance to write, build and film a broadcast presentation.

Student detectives solve math puzzles using an escape room kit purchased by the LPS Foundation.

Littleton Public Schools got their very own fairy godmother in the form of an anonymous donor who gifted every school in LPS with $1,000 to improve mental and social emotional health.

Students dance their way to mental and physical wellness with Celebrate the Beat.

Students at Hopkins Elementary are reading by the campfire, communing with wildlife and enjoying green grass in their newly updated media center thanks to a teacher grant from us. 

Calming Corners help students identify feelings and emotions to better manage stress, self-regulate and control their impulses.

Specialized Reading Training serves Students and Educators thanks to a grant from the Littleton Public Schools Foundation.

Heritage High School's Source of Strength Club asked students, teachers and staff to decorate painted tiles with positive, uplifting quotes and drawings. Students enthusiastically embraced the idea, decorating 500 tiles over three days.

LPS’ Transition Services students are gaining valuable vocational training and flexing their creative muscles through the operation of their own store, Rebel Hawk.

LPS Middle School students' ancient western hemisphere unit came to life when the Grupo Tlaloc Danza Azteca visited their classroom to share music, dance and stories about their culture and traditions.

High school students learn about the life cycle of fish by raising trout and releasing them into the Platte River.

High School students learn how to portray emotions through light, make minions and superheroes look their best, and work together to produce quality content thanks to a grant from LPSF!

Runyon's Mental Health Team received a grant for materials that gave students a chance to talk about and cope with what they were experiencing.

Students at Mark Twain Elementary are solving problems in new ways thanks to a STEM makerspace funded by LPSF. The space includes 16 bins with materials, along with STEM activity cards for diverse learners

One of the many ways that your gifts to the LPS Foundation benefit students and teachers is through Teacher Grants. This Fall, the World Language Department at Arapahoe High School received a grant to purchase a variety of world language books, including novels, short stories, graphic novels and non-fiction books.

With grant money from LPSF, Goddard Middle School Teacher, Shayna Wood, bought books with culturally diverse characters, graphic novels and high interest/low readability levels.

Goddard Middle School Art Teacher, Shannon Hanschen, always dreamed about building a choice-based art program where students choose from a variety of mediums to express their creativity. Thanks to you, her dream became a reality.

"Our students benefitted emotionally, physically, and socially by participating in the activities where they worked together and completed important skills"

Thanks to a grant funded by YOU, our generous donors, teacher Aimee Dierking purchased several sensory enhancement items for her classroom, including wiggle stools.

Disinfectant that turns into chalk? Yep, you read that right. Learn how the chalk is helping students climb to new heights.

With the help of LPSF, LPS students form a group committed to promoting social-emotional awareness, mental health, kindness, and suicide prevention within their school communities.

Hartley, Brady, Zachary, Eli, and Jackson are loving online learning partially because of two interactive programs funded by the Littleton Public Schools Foundation.

Computer science equipment purchased by LPSF allows students to combine programming with external stimuli, making abstract concepts of computer science more concrete.

Gaga Ball provides a fun, fast-paced, silly way to blow off steam, feel connected and remember the importance of laughter and play. Read more about how it is helping 8th graders at LHS.

132 lives saved thanks to a SOS student blood drive.

The LPS Foundation provided $50,000 in funding to provide healthy breakfast and lunch meals to kids in our community at the height of the pandemic.

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